Training

Training designed for people working with drug users

Working with ‘route transitions’ to protect health and reduce harm

Available for practitioners of all levels, this course can also be tailored to the needs of DAAT commissioners. The focus is on evidence and practice regarding interventions that aim to reduce injecting by a) preventing the transition to injecting b) examining alternatives to injecting that can be used generally and in in high risk situations when equipment is shared or overdose risks are higher. Training can be tailored across 1-3 days and can include:

  • An overview of the intervention opportunities and the ‘transitions' evidence-base
  • Skills training on the Break the Cycle intervention
  • Examination of the practicalities of administering drugs intranasally (sniffing/snorting), by inhalation (chasing) and rectally
  • A workshop approach to the development of a sustainable local strategy

Understanding and using research and audit

Available for practitioners of all levels, this course can also be tailored to the needs of DAAT commissioners. The focus is on a) understanding how to use clinical audit effectively to improve clinical services b) understanding and using research to inform practice. Training can be tailored across 1-3 days and can include:

  • The clinical audit cycle
  • Designing and implementing clinical audit
  • Commonly encountered qualitative and quantitative research designs
  • Critical appraisal of research
  • Translating evidence into action – when and how to change practice

Drug use and mental health

Available for practitioners of all levels, this course can also be tailored to the needs of DAAT commissioners. The focus is on a) key concepts within mental health, mental disorder and its management b) 'dual diagnosis' and the roles of community mental teams/community drug teams. Training can be tailored across 1-3 days and can include:

  • The main forms of serious and enduring mental health problems that are encountered
  • The main pharmacological and psychological treatments that are commonly used
  • Clinical issues associated with managing 'dual diagnosis'
  • The 'dual diagnosis' policy environment
  • A problem-solving approach to local practice issues

‘Recreational’ drug use: health, risk and harm

Available for practitioners of all levels, this course can also be tailored to the needs of DAAT commissioners. The training draws on six years of involvement with the annual Mixmag survey and is targeted at people working with recreational/dance-drug users. Training can be tailored across 1-3 days and can include:

  • Patterns in use of ecstasy, cocaine, amphetamines, ketamine, LSD, mushrooms, GHB as well as other ‘exotica’ (e.g. Blue Mystic, 2CB, 2Ci)
  • Reducing risk and harm associated with the commonly encountered ‘recreational’ drugs
  • ‘Club health’ – guidance and regulations for venues
  • Clubbers sexual health and safety – contraception, STIs and sexual assault

Basic health checks

A one day introductory course for drug workers who do not have a nursing/medical background, explaining and develops skills necessary for:

  • Monitoring height/weight and body mass index with reference to obesity/malnutrition among drug users
  • Measuring radial pulse
  • Using a sphygmomanometer to measure blood pressure
  • Monitoring respiratory health using 'peak flow'

Self-controlled heroin use: working with people who want to resume or sustain self-controlled heroin use

A one day course drawing on the latest evidence about how some heroin users avoid problematic use/dependence

  • Aimed at practitioners who work with heroin users who – initially at least – aim to achieve self-managed heroin use rather than enter more structured long term treatments
  • Addresses self-controlled heroin use within an integrated care pathway approach, which recognises that opioid substitution and structured treatment will nevertheless become necessary for some people

Drug Consumption Rooms

A one day course that appraises the international evidence regarding the ways that Drug Consumption Rooms may enhance the health of the most marginalised drug users and simultaneously reduce nuisance to communities.

  • Aimed at practice and policy specialists who wish to understand the issues associated with Drug Consumption Rooms and their implementation in countries such as Australia, Canada, Germany and Switzerland
  • Examines the policy environment in the UK and the opportunities and constraints on their use